There's a post going around on Facebook warning pet owners of a certain ingredient in some peanut butters that could be deadly to pets... Is it true, or is it another hoax going around?

There's a lot of information and stories that get passed along on Facebook, it's hard to know what's actually true or not. After seeing this specific post that was warning pet owners, we decided to look into it and see if it was a hoax...

And it's not.

It REALLY is a serious warning for pet owners.

According to the post on Facebook by Toys4Paws.com:

 A new type of peanut butter (and other nut butters) is being sold with less sugar, but now includes xylitol as a sweetener. That is what is used in sugarless gum and it can be deadly to dogs. Many people use peanut butter as a dog treat, or to fill a Kong, or disguise medications...

The post shows the above quote (and more) typed up on a piece of paper, with a little note on the bottom stating: "Worth sharing for anyone with a dog."

And Toys4Paws.com is right. It's definitely worth a share. We decided to look up this "xylitol sweetener," and according to the Veterinary Centers of America it's extremely toxic and can even cause death in our four-legged friends.The Veterinary Centers of America says you can find xylitol in:

sugar-free gum, candies, breath mints, baked goods, pudding snacks, cough syrup, children's chewable or gummy vitamins and supplements, mouthwash, and toothpaste...

As for peanut butter? Well, we checked the label on the back of the peanut butter we had, and it wasn't listed. BUT that doesn't mean it's not in other peanut butters, including the one you may have in your kitchen. It's actually in a lot of "health food" items, bars, and things like that, because it's a way to sweeten foods without adding lots of calories.

The VCA says xylitol is fine for people, but is "extremely" toxic for dogs...

Even small amounts of xylitol can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), seizures, liver failure or even death...

The Facebook post (mentioned above) is from last year (February 2018), but it still holds true, and is still worth sharing. Just be careful giving your pets treats and make sure you read ingredient lists carefully. And if you're not sure? Ask your vet first - It's not worth the risk.

You can get more information on xylitol toxicity by visiting: VCAHospitals.com

 

 

[Toys4Paws.com's Facebook Post]

[VCAHospitals.com - Xylitol Toxicity in Dogs]