The legend of the Spirit House begins with Timothy Brown in 1869 in Georgetown, NY. It is said that Brown had no experience with construction prior to this home, but informed those who questioned his skills that spirits were guiding him on how to construct the home.  As pictures of the home attest, the finished result is a ornately decorated home.

Timothy Brown reportedly intended the Spirit House to be a location for Spiritualists to gather and communicate with spirits, and the house was designed for this purpose. Brown designated all the closets in the home as safe havens for the spirits, and he built a windowless room where the spirits could be summoned.

For a time, the Spirit House was a busy gathering point of Spiritualists. It is reported that one of the mediums who came to the Spirit House to conduct a séance had a notebook containing information obtained from local cemeteries. Once their fraud was discovered, the residents of Georgetown became distrustful of the Spiritualists who visited the Spirit House, and the house’s heyday as a spiritual center was over.

Today, the Spirit House is unoccupied, and is slowly falling into disrepair, but it holds on to its reputation of being paranormally active. Because the home is unoccupied, and has previously been owned by people who were intensely private, not much is known about the paranormal activity in the home, but numerous reports have been written about the high energy around the home.

The story of the Spirit House is a good representation of how the Spiritualism Movement was generally perceived. As we approached the end of the nineteenth century, the Spiritualism Movement was wildly popular, and embraced by a good percentage of the population. But, as shown by the Spirit House, once fraud became more commonly known, the Spiritualism became unpopular, leading to the movement’s decline.

UPDATE: The house is now privately owned and does not accept solicitors.

[Contributed by NY Shadow Chasers]

More about the Spirit House from the Otselic Valley Central School District/Jason Kampe