Most people take a type of acetaminophen when they have a headache, or some kind of muscle ache, but those little pills may be affecting you on a side you didn't realize - your emotions.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

A new study has been done, showing some of the effects of using acetaminophen, but this time they weren't looking at how well the medicine works. Instead, they were looking at the way it affects people's emotions - both good and bad emotions.

According to The Observer, studies were done with a group of college students. The group was shown photographs and told to rate them on a scale of pleasant to unpleasant. After they rated the photographs, half the college students were given acetaminophen, and the other half took a placebo. They were then asked to rate the pictures again. The Observer reported,

The findings showed those who took the acetaminophen rated the images less extremely compared to the placebo group...

"People who took acetaminophen didn't feel the same highs or lows as did the people who took placebos," co-author [of the study] Baldwin Way said.

 

The study shows that not only does taking over-the-counter aspirin affect your muscles and aches, but it also affects your emotions, whether they're positive or negative.